AIDS in Amazonia: An unresolved issue

AIDS in Amazonia: An unresolved issue

In the collective imagination, Amazonia is a huge green expanse bathed by the incomparable river that lends it its name, a region of adventure, indigenous cultures in their pure state and nature. Very few people associate this zone with sociocultural isolation and a shortage of health-related means and infrastructures. This is why some illnesses are more complex to manage there, including HIV-AIDS.

Precisely because of its unique features, this is one of the zones in the world where it is the most difficult to treat diseases like AIDS. For example, in Peru, the Awajum people and other Amazonian communities affected by HIV have retained certain customs and traditions which reflect their geographic isolation and exclusion from the national development process. This means that their social and economic vulnerability and their lack of access to social services is a constant.

Some years ago, the UN, through UNAids, established a Comprehensive Plan with the goal of strengthening the local capacity to better respond to the AIDS epidemic, as well as to harmonize the actions of the UN agencies and other associated organizations in order to optimize the use of technical and financial resources and support the local governments' priorities. It also sought to reinforce inter-sectoral action and to mobilize new resources and associations to support local responses to AIDS. However, the epidemic is still raging.

HIV-AIDS: A complex disease in Amazonia

In the collective imagination, Amazonia is a huge green expanse bathed by the incomparable river that lends it its name, a region of adventure, indigenous cultures in their pure state and nature. Very few people associate this zone with sociocultural isolation and a shortage of health-related means and infrastructures. This is why some illnesses are more complex to manage there, including HIV-AIDS.

Precisely because of its unique features, this is one of the zones in the world where it is the most difficult to treat diseases like AIDS. For example, in Peru, the Awajum people and other Amazonian communities affected by HIV have retained certain customs and traditions which reflect their geographic isolation and exclusion from the national development process. This means that their social and economic vulnerability and their lack of access to social services is a constant.

Some years ago, the UN, through UNAids, established a Comprehensive Plan with the goal of strengthening the local capacity to better respond to the AIDS epidemic, as well as to harmonize the actions of the UN agencies and other associated organizations in order to optimize the use of technical and financial resources and support the local governments' priorities. It also sought to reinforce inter-sectoral action and to mobilize new resources and associations to support local responses to AIDS. However, the epidemic is still raging.

Prevention and education: Unresolved issues

In the collective imagination, Amazonia is a huge green expanse bathed by the incomparable river that lends it its name, a region of adventure, indigenous cultures in their pure state and nature. Very few people associate this zone with sociocultural isolation and a shortage of health-related means and infrastructures. This is why some illnesses are more complex to manage there, including HIV-AIDS.

Precisely because of its unique features, this is one of the zones in the world where it is the most difficult to treat diseases like AIDS. For example, in Peru, the Awajum people and other Amazonian communities affected by HIV have retained certain customs and traditions which reflect their geographic isolation and exclusion from the national development process. This means that their social and economic vulnerability and their lack of access to social services is a constant.

Some years ago, the UN, through UNAids, established a Comprehensive Plan with the goal of strengthening the local capacity to better respond to the AIDS epidemic, as well as to harmonize the actions of the UN agencies and other associated organizations in order to optimize the use of technical and financial resources and support the local governments' priorities. It also sought to reinforce inter-sectoral action and to mobilize new resources and associations to support local responses to AIDS. However, the epidemic is still raging.

Probitas' action

In the collective imagination, Amazonia is a huge green expanse bathed by the incomparable river that lends it its name, a region of adventure, indigenous cultures in their pure state and nature. Very few people associate this zone with sociocultural isolation and a shortage of health-related means and infrastructures. This is why some illnesses are more complex to manage there, including HIV-AIDS.

Precisely because of its unique features, this is one of the zones in the world where it is the most difficult to treat diseases like AIDS. For example, in Peru, the Awajum people and other Amazonian communities affected by HIV have retained certain customs and traditions which reflect their geographic isolation and exclusion from the national development process. This means that their social and economic vulnerability and their lack of access to social services is a constant.

Some years ago, the UN, through UNAids, established a Comprehensive Plan with the goal of strengthening the local capacity to better respond to the AIDS epidemic, as well as to harmonize the actions of the UN agencies and other associated organizations in order to optimize the use of technical and financial resources and support the local governments' priorities. It also sought to reinforce inter-sectoral action and to mobilize new resources and associations to support local responses to AIDS. However, the epidemic is still raging.