5 keys for understanding the Human Development Index (HDI)

5 keys for understanding the Human Development Index (HDI)

What does the indicator called Human Development Index (HDI) measure? The interpretation of this indicator reflects the socioeconomic reality of a country and the real needs of the population? What impact does it have on the political decisions taken by a country?

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a statistical index used for classifying the countries according to their degree of "human development". It is a comparative measure that has in mind variables such as life expectancy, literacy, education and the standard of living of a country. It is an average that measures welfare, and it is used to tell if a country is developed, developing or underdeveloped; but it also measures the impact of socioeconomic policies on the quality of life.

This index differentiates between countries with "a very high human development", "a high human development", "a medium human development" and "a low human development". The HDI was conceived and started to use by the Pakistani economist Mahbub Ul Haq and the Indian economist Amartya Sen in 1990 for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). There are also HDI measurements for states, towns, villages, etc., and for local organisations or companies.

5 keys to better understand what does HDI measure

What does the indicator called Human Development Index (HDI) measure? The interpretation of this indicator reflects the socioeconomic reality of a country and the real needs of the population? What impact does it have on the political decisions taken by a country?

The Human Development Index (HDI) is a statistical index used for classifying the countries according to their degree of "human development". It is a comparative measure that has in mind variables such as life expectancy, literacy, education and the standard of living of a country. It is an average that measures welfare, and it is used to tell if a country is developed, developing or underdeveloped; but it also measures the impact of socioeconomic policies on the quality of life.

This index differentiates between countries with "a very high human development", "a high human development", "a medium human development" and "a low human development". The HDI was conceived and started to use by the Pakistani economist Mahbub Ul Haq and the Indian economist Amartya Sen in 1990 for the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). There are also HDI measurements for states, towns, villages, etc., and for local organisations or companies.